Re: [CR] "Funky" Old Panniers


Example: Production Builders:Tonard

From: "David Snyder" <dddd@pacbell.net>
To: <classicrendezvous@bikelist.org>
References: <mailman.8822.1279641906.76241.classicrendezvous@bikelist.org> <515EB7B8-494E-4D3A-8355-0DE2ACF8BB9B@gmail.com> <4C4B37B5.5050206@os2.dhs.org>
In-Reply-To: <4C4B37B5.5050206@os2.dhs.org>
Date: Sat, 24 Jul 2010 14:36:05 -0700
Subject: Re: [CR] "Funky" Old Panniers


I've soaked some really smelly fabric artifacts in a VERY dilute bleach solution to good effect.

My thinking was that it would be best to eliminate any microbes (esp fungus) in the process of deoderizing, lest the population of smellies caused the odor(s) to return (the next time the fabric got damp during use).

Once the bugs and dirt are gone, the natural airing-out process (brought on by riding) should cause any remaining odors to diminish in a reasonable time.

Timely article in the paper yesterday discussing the foodborne pathogen problem brought on by the use of re-usable (cloth, etc.) grocery bags. Conclusion: the bags need to be washed periodically, esp if you carry raw meat in them.

I re-use the plastic disposable ones (always doubled) and haul all kinds of purchases (and finds) with them tied tightly around the uppers of my pre-1984 road bike bars (I then use them as garbage pail liners after just a couple of on-the-road uses). It's important to tie the handles tight, shortening the hanging load, to prevent excess sway. Note that a doubled bag is somehow many times stronger than a single one, and that the HDPE "crinkley" ones are far stronger and easier to tie/un-tie than the LDPE "stretchy/supple" ones. And, twisting the handles into a sort of hard rope, then triple-knotting, makes un-tieing a million times easier!

David Snyder Still wearing the (formerly) "nasty" Shimano shoes about Auburn, CA usa


----- Original Message -----



> On 07/20/2010 12:26 PM, Leslie Connally wrote:
>
>> There is a product available at hardware stores called OdorBan, but
>> others also, which is an enzymatic and perfumed concentrated liquid made
>> to eliminate "pet odors" (aka cat piss).
>>
>> Also, old standby for moldy camping gear is lemon juice. (though not
>> sure if such an acidic juice would be good for $gore-tex, but these
>> panniers are not)
>
> Gore-Tex is a teflon/nylon fabric laminate. Both materials are quite
> chemically inert; I doubt lemon juice would be a problem.
> --
>
> -John Thompson (john@os2.dhs.org)
> Appleton WI USA